The Charisma outlet online sale Myth: How outlet online sale Anyone Can Master the Art and Science of Personal Magnetism online

The Charisma outlet online sale Myth: How outlet online sale Anyone Can Master the Art and Science of Personal Magnetism online

The Charisma outlet online sale Myth: How outlet online sale Anyone Can Master the Art and Science of Personal Magnetism online
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What if charisma could be taught?

The charisma myth is the idea that charisma is a fundamental, inborn quality—you either have it (Bill Clinton, Steve Jobs, Oprah) or you don’t. But that’s simply not true, as Olivia Fox Cabane reveals. Charismatic behaviors can be learned and perfected by anyone.

Drawing on techniques she originally developed for Harvard and MIT, Cabane breaks charisma down into its components. Becoming more charismatic doesn’t mean transforming your fundamental personality. It’s about adopting a series of specific practices that fit in with the personality you already have.

The Charisma Myth shows you how to become more influential, more persuasive, and more inspiring.

Review

“The top book I’ve read all year.”
—Dr. Tina Seelig, Executive Director for the Stanford Technology Ventures Program (STVP), the entrepreneurship center at Stanford University''s School of Engineering, and  author of inGenius: A Crash Course on Creativity . 
“Olivia Fox Cabane offers hands-on advice and a practical guide to humanizing leaders without comprising integrity or authority. She focused on the ‘it’ factors that can make a real difference.”
—Laura Lang, CEO, Time Inc.

 

“Cabane has done us a big favor. She’s woven solid science and engaging narrative into an instructive treatment of the role of charisma in leadership—a topic that (until now) we only poorly understood.”
—Robert B. Cialdini, author of Influence

“If you are interested in increasing your ability to be charismatic in your unique setting or employment, this book will give you direct skills to use.”
Psychology Today

“The Charisma Myth is an easy read, effectively integrating stories and research, strategies and applications, techniques and practices.”
New York Journal of Books

“We can’t all be as charismatic as Alexander the Great or Madonna, but with Cabane’s help, we can sure get close!”
—Marshall Goldsmith, author of Mojo

About the Author

Olivia Fox Cabane has lectured at Stanford, Yale, Harvard, MIT, and the United Nations. As an executive coach to the leadership of Fortune 500 companies, her clients include Google, Deloitte, and Citigroup. She is a regular columnist for Forbes and has been featured in The New York Times, Bloomberg BusinessWeek, and The Wall Street Journal. For more information about Olivia Fox Cabane, please visit: AskOlivia.com

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andrew
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Mixed feelings. Great as a playbook of charismatic behaviors, but has bad psychology.
Reviewed in the United States on March 1, 2019
I''m not sure how to feel about this book. Olivia Fox Cabane is a charisma coach of sorts, and I''m sure she''s great at her job. On that grounds, it''s reasonable to assume that she has some good advice on being charismatic. And that''s true, to an extent. What Cabane isn''t is... See more
I''m not sure how to feel about this book. Olivia Fox Cabane is a charisma coach of sorts, and I''m sure she''s great at her job. On that grounds, it''s reasonable to assume that she has some good advice on being charismatic. And that''s true, to an extent. What Cabane isn''t is a psychologist, so we can only trust that she has researched the field well and brings us valid conclusions. Sadly, this book doesn''t always bring that. Among other things, Cabane brings up studies from psychology superstars like Baumeister''s "willpower is like a muscle" idea or Amy Cuddy''s power posing. The problem with that is that these "superstar" studies tend to fail to replicate, meaning that when tested, their theories fail to hold up, and if we''re looking for advice for applying psychology to our own lives, it''s entirely counterproductive to read a book with advice based on them. Popular psychology and self-help books, especially the new wave of self help that pinky promises they''re based on real research, are plagued with this kind of stuff. (The willpower muscle is a really shoddy theoretical concept to begin with, and nobody should be concerned too much about their own willpower. Read about self-management in the field of applied behavior analysis to learn more. If I can reconmend one thing in this review, its for you to start being skeptical of popular psychology in self-help and the "superstars" that follow these kinds of theories.)

One of the core messages of this book is that you have to feel the emotions you want to project. If you''re feeling anxious or generally negative, as the book says, these emotions will "leak" out (in the form of micro expressions, which are pretty much agreed to not be detectable by almost all people), and turn people off. I can''t really accept this idea mostly because I''ve seen so many counterexamples of it. I''ve seen and known lots of incredibly anxious or depressed people project intense charisma, usually out of their own social anxiety and desire to be accepted. There''s no way you can put former idea forward and not acknowledge the latter. I don''t have any problem accepting that positive emotions will help you perform charismatic behaviors, I think that''s true, but it''s simply not true that one feeling negative emotions will never be charismatic. Charismatic behavior is charismatic behavior. To be charismatic, perform charismatic behavior. That''s all there is to it.

Running with this idea, the book then tries to present, in a few chapters, some kind of platter or quick fixes to treat negative emotions. This part really confuses me. What is she trying to do? Write a self-help book for every negative emotion, anxiety, and depression? Again, these are certainly useful for psyching yourself into a mood that will assist you in performing charismatic behaviors, but it''s like she''s trying to conjure up some mindfulness based self-help treatment for everything. Cabane is a coach, not a psychologist. But she writes like she has that authority. And it comes down hard.

So what does this book do well? In her element, Cabane''s classification of charisma styles is brilliant. She has wonderful advice and presents and explains lots of charismatic behaviors. She''s great at this! I''ve remembered lots of the tips and ideas from the latter part of this book and have used them to great success. The stuff about conscious mirroring is fantastic, as well as the "presence, power, and warmth" framework of charisma. I liked the stuff on warmth the best.

Overall, I''d recommend this book but only if you take the "you have to have positive emotions to be charismatic so here''s how to deal with all negative emotions in 3 chapters" part with a grain of salt. Oh, and google the replication crisis of psychology, and take a clear mental note of the pop star researchers and smash hit theories that have been debunked. You''ll encounter a few of them in this book. Finally, don''t get discouraged, because most of what comes after is absolutely solid advice on being charismatic, and what factors make up charisma.
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Emily
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The secret to confidence
Reviewed in the United States on January 16, 2021
How is it that some people can just walk into a room, and in moments, you believe they are powerful? I''d always been fascinated by that and how I can weave this mastery over body language, eye contact, and manner of speaking into my own life. Through this book, I feel like... See more
How is it that some people can just walk into a room, and in moments, you believe they are powerful? I''d always been fascinated by that and how I can weave this mastery over body language, eye contact, and manner of speaking into my own life. Through this book, I feel like I''ve been given a playbook: To be a charismatic person, you have to give the impression that you have a lot of power and that you like the other person/people a lot. You don''t need to impress people, you let them impress you. You don’t need to sound smart; you just need to make them feel smart.

The secret isn''t that complicated. You have to truly believe in yourself. When you are able to build a system of self-confidence and resiliency to against detractors that bring you down, your body takes on that mentality. While that sounds obvious and crazy difficult, this book has a number of concrete reframes and exercises you can use to walk that path.

You need to do 3 things for someone to perceive you as charismatic:
* Power - Being perceived as able to affect the world around them
* Warmth - Will use whatever power you have in their favor
* Presence - Has your full attention and you are the most important thing in the world to them at this moment

3 quick tips
* Lower the intonation of your voice at the end of your sentences. When you want to sound superconfident, you can even lower your intonation midsentence.
* Reduce how quickly and how often you nod
* Pause for two full seconds before you speak

Increasing your charisma requires first knowing which internal obstacles are currently inhibiting your personal charisma potential. Techniques to do this:
* Mindfulness - Become aware when you are tensing, feeling anxious
* Responsibility transfer - Consider that there might be an all-powerful entity—the Universe, God, Fate—and entrust it with all the worries on your mind. Imagine yourself converting your source of worry into a physical form and giving it to the powerful entity, reliving that burden from you.
* Destigmatizing - Understanding that our worry is normal, common, and nothing to be anxious about or ashamed of. If you’ve just lost a key client, for instance, think of someone you know—a mentor you have a high regard for, or a colleague you respect—who suffered a similar setback. Imagine them going through this experience.
* Neutralize negative thoughts - Recognize that your thoughts aren’t necessarily accurate. The next time you think you see coldness or reservation in someone’s face while they’re talking to you, try to remember that it could simply be the visible signs of their internal discomfort. There’s a good chance that it has nothing to do with how they feel about you or what you’ve just said.
* Rewrite reality - Choose the explanation that is most helpful to us and create a version of events that gets us into the specific mental state we need for charisma. What if this unfortunate, unpleasant experience is absolutely perfect just as it is? A gift? Find ways to be grateful.

Visualization - As it has been proven to help alter our mind state, relive past victories and project future ones. Guided imagery must be precise, vivid, and detailed to be effective. When visualization is used with Olympic ski teams, skiers visualize themselves careening through the entire course, feeling their muscles tensing, experiencing each bump and turn in their minds.
* Play music while you verbalize or subvocalize, choosing songs that you know make you feel especially energized and confident
* Imagine a relevant, more extreme scene. If you have to be warm and empathetic going into a meeting, imagine a young child coming to tell you her troubles at school.

Example - close your eyes:
Remember a past experience when you felt absolutely triumphant—for example, the day you won a contest or an award. ♦ Hear the sounds in the room: the murmurs of approval, the swell of applause. ♦ See people’s smiles and expressions of warmth and admiration. ♦ Feel your feet on the ground and the congratulatory handshakes. ♦ Above all, experience your feelings, the warm glow of confidence rising within you.

Show goodwill
Goodwill is a highly effective way both to project warmth and to create a feeling of warmth in others. When you truly focus on someone’s well-being, you feel more connected to them, it shows across your face, and people perceive you as someone full of warmth. Your charisma quotient soars. When our only aim is to broadcast goodwill, it takes the pressure off. We’re no longer striving, struggling, pushing for things to go in a certain direction. And since we’re less concerned about how the interaction goes, we can both feel and project more charismatic confidence.
* Find three things you like about the person you want to feel goodwill toward
* What if this were their last day alive? You can even imagine their funeral. You’re at their funeral, and you’re asked to say a few words about them. You can also imagine what you’d say to them after they’d already died.
* Smile

Grow self-compassion
Self-confidence is our belief in our ability to do or to learn how to do something. Self-esteem is how much we approve of or value ourselves. It’s often a comparison-based evaluation (whether measured against other people or against our own internal standards for approval). Self-compassion is how much warmth we can have for ourselves, especially when we’re going through a difficult experience. Self-compassion is what helps us forgive ourselves when we’ve fallen short; it’s what prevents internal criticism from taking over and playing across our face, ruining our charisma potential. In this way, self-compassion is critical to emanating warmth.

Sit comfortably, close your eyes, and take two or three deep breaths. As you inhale, imagine drawing in masses of clean air toward the top of your head; then let it whoosh through you from head to toe as you exhale, washing all concerns away. ♦ Think of any occasion in your life when you performed a good deed, however great or small. Just one good action—one moment of truth, generosity, or courage. Focus on that memory for a moment. ♦ Now think of one being, whether present or past, mythical or actual—Jesus, Buddha, Mother Teresa, Muhammed, or the Dalai Lama—who could have great affection for you. This could be a person, a pet, or even a stuffed animal. ♦ Picture this being in your mind. Imagine their warmth, their kindness and compassion. See it in their eyes and face. Feel their warmth radiating toward you, enveloping you. ♦ See yourself through their eyes with warmth, kindness, and compassion. Feel them giving you complete forgiveness for everything your inner critic says is wrong. You are completely and absolutely forgiven. You have a clean slate. ♦ Feel them giving you wholehearted acceptance. You are accepted as you are, right now, at this stage of growth, imperfections and all.

Warm up
* On the day of the marathon, what would you do as you arrived? Would you just stand around until the starting gun and then tear off at top speed? Of course not. You’d probably take care to warm up carefully.
* If, at dinner, you want to broadcast absolute self-confidence, make sure that the day of and especially the hours leading up to the dinner do not include meetings or interactions that could make you feel bad about yourself. Rather than just showing up at dinner, plan a warm-up that will boost your self-esteem: have coffee with someone who makes you feel good about yourself, or plan an activity (play a sport or a musical instrument) that makes you feel competent or accomplished.
* Create your own music playlist for the internal state you’d like to have. You could make one for energy and confidence, one that makes you feel warm and empathetic, and another that makes you feel calm and serene.
* Let’s say that you’re about to discuss a difficult issue with someone who intimidates you. To warm up for the meeting, practice first in your mind, visualizing the scene as you would like it to unfold. Then ask someone with whom you feel comfortable to role-play the situation with you. Make sure you adopt a strong, confident posture. Imagine yourself as a four-star army general reviewing his troops. Take a wide stance, puff up your chest, broaden your shoulders, stand straight, and confidently put your arms behind your back. Practice making your arguments with a strong voice and imposing hand gestures.
* Even if you’re really late to a meeting, it’s worth taking just thirty seconds to get back into the right mental state and body language. Otherwise you risk giving a very uncharismatic first impression.

Types of Charisma
* Focus - They can can feel the intensity of your attention, how keenly you listens and absorbs everything they say. Nonverbal body language makes them feel completely listened to, understood, and respected. Use when you need people to open up and share information. Avoid when you need to appear authoritative or during emergencies when you need immediate compliance.
* Visionary - Make them feel inspired. Project complete conviction and confidence in a cause. Sell on the vision, not yourself. Use when you need to inspire people.
* Kindness - Radiating warmth. Connected to their heart, making them feel welcomed, cherished, embraced, and accepted. Primarily from eyes. Avoid any body language of tension, criticism, or coldness. Use to create emotional bond or make people feel safe and comfortable, deliver bad news. Avoid when needing to appear authoritative.
* Authority - Perception of power, ability to influence others. Clothing that shows status. Take up space, minimal movement, slow speaking, pausing, modulating tone. Use to get listened to and be obeyed, in a criss. Avoid when you want to encourage creativity, or constructive feedback.

Right charisma to use
* How are the people around you feeling? What do they need in this moment?

Building resonance when speaking
* Bounce back - Answer the question with a fact, add a personal note, and redirect the question to them, as follows: Other Person: “So where are you moving to?” You: “To Chelsea [fact]. We fell in love with the parks and the bakeries [personal note]. What do you think of the neighborhood [redirect]?”
* Use "you" - Instead of saying “I read a great article on that subject in the New York Times,” try “You might enjoy the recent New York Times article on the subject.” Or simply insert “You know…” before any sentence to make them instantly perk up and pay attention.
* Relevant metaphors - If they’re into golf and you want to talk about success, speak of hitting a hole in one. If they sail, a catastrophe becomes a shipwreck.
* Pause - Pause. People who broadcast confidence often pause while speaking. They will pause for a second or two between sentences or even in the middle of a sentence. This conveys the feeling that they’re so confident in their power, they trust that people won’t interrupt.
* Modulate tone - Making your voice vary in any of the following ways: pitch (high or low), volume (loud or quiet), tone (resonant or hollow), tempo (fast or slow), or rhythm (fluid or staccato). The lower, more resonant, and more baritone your voice, the more impact it will have. A slow, measured tempo with frequent pauses conveys confidence.
* Stay present in your body and awareness of them
* Use imagery and metaphors - Presidents rated as charismatic, such as Franklin Delano Roosevelt and Abraham Lincoln, used twice as many visual metaphors in their inaugural addresses as did those rated as noncharismatic. When Steve Jobs launched the iPod Nano, he needed a dramatic way to illustrate its small size and light weight. First, he pulled it out of the smallest pocket of his jeans, giving tangible proof of just how small and slim it was. Second, he compared the Nano’s weight to eight quarters: his presentation slide shows the iPod on one side and eight quarters on the other.
* Positive language - When you tell someone, “No problem,” “Don’t worry,” or “Don’t hesitate to call,” for example, there’s a chance their brain will remember “problem,” “worry,” or “hesitate” instead of your desire to support them. To counter this negative effect, use phrases like “We’ll take care of it” or “Please feel free to call anytime.”
* Mirror body language - Try to mirror the other person’s overall posture: the way they hold their head, how they place their feet, the shifts in their weight. If they move their left hand, move your right hand. Aim also to adapt your voice to theirs in speed, pitch, and intonation. As long as their body is in a certain emotional mode, it will be nearly impossible to get their mind to feel something different.

How to listen
* Be totally attentive, noting when you drift off and come back and reset eye contact
* Breathe deeply
* Don''t interrupt
* Let your facial expression react first, showing that you’re absorbing what they’ve just said
* Pause 2 seconds (feel like forever)
* Position well - Avoid a confrontational seating arrangement and instead sit either next to or at a 90-degree angle from them.
* Keep eye contact for three full seconds at the end of your interaction with someone.

Quick Guide
1. take a breath with hand over heart to get present, relaxed, and self compassionate
2. Stand up tall with a smile, feeling confident and warm
3. Recall a prior moment that evokes this mood. Relive it with sights, sounds, movements
4. Envision how I''d like to be. Live it with sights, sounds, movements.
5. Think about the person I''m meeting. Identity 3 positive qualities about them.
6. Look at others in the eyes, pretend they are an expert who you''re listening to with rapt attention
7. Listen completely, keeping body tall and warm.
8. React first in face, pause before speaking
9. Articulate what they said back, bottom line to the essence
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Amazon Customer
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
High on Filler, Lacks Charm
Reviewed in the United States on August 8, 2018
If I were the editor, I’d rip into the length of this. There is way too much filler. It’s as if she needed needed about a hundred more pages to meet her quota. This holds true throughout. And the last seventh or so of the book is all recaps. Additionally, it... See more
If I were the editor, I’d rip into the length of this. There is way too much filler. It’s as if she needed needed about a hundred more pages to meet her quota. This holds true throughout. And the last seventh or so of the book is all recaps.

Additionally, it was ironic to see that she recommends the magic of concision in email composition. There are a couple tips that I find useful, but they could have been expressed in three to four pages, not 224. A blog post would cover this.

I think this could be useful for quick skimmers and perhaps people with low EQ. Ultimately, it did not have enough warmth, concision, or charm for me.
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Brian Sharp
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The best book of its kind I''ve ever read
Reviewed in the United States on May 15, 2012
I read a lot of books in this genre - call it "professional self-help." I''ve spoken professionally a few times now about leadership and communication, and for my most recent one just a few months ago I did a ton of reading research and a lot of it was books like this one.... See more
I read a lot of books in this genre - call it "professional self-help." I''ve spoken professionally a few times now about leadership and communication, and for my most recent one just a few months ago I did a ton of reading research and a lot of it was books like this one. Most of them are mediocre. I began reading The Charisma Myth expecting more of the same, frankly: platitudes, some common sense stuff, the kinds of advice that will only make sense to people who don''t need it. I was just hoping for a tidbit or two that would be useful.

I don''t really gush about things. If anything I tend to be very demanding and therefore very critical. Like I said, I think most books in this genre are essentially useless.

The Charisma Myth is a truly phenomenal book. It''s so good that I have recommended it to several of my colleagues and it has already changed the way I manage my team and relate to my coworkers. In fact, my first gut reaction when I read it was "I guess I should stop speaking, now, because everything I''d want to talk about is covered in here."

Here''s the thing: most of these kinds of books give you a few things:

1. Platitudes: useless, pithy sayings.
2. Random Anecdotes: stories that don''t really offer any takeaway you can act on.
3. Abstract Imperatives: things like "be a good listener!" If you''re not already a good listener that''s kind of like saying "Roast Beef Recipe: Get some beef and roast it." It''s not helpful - it doesn''t tell me what actual specific actions to take.

Here''s what this book gave me:

1. Extremely concrete, specific actions: Every piece of advice about conduct or mindset is accompanied by direct actions to take. When you''re in a conversation and find your mind drifting, bring it back to a physical sensation in the present, like the feeling in your toes. That''s just one example of many, but they''re all things you can actually DO, not abstract imperatives like "be a better listener" or pithy-but-vapid stuff like "smile more!"

2. Visualizations: I''ve never seen anyone push visualization like Olivia does. She makes the compelling point that visualization is something top athletes and actors have known about forever. In my talks I''ve always felt slightly uncomfortable urging people to do visualizations, but not anymore, not after reading this. She runs through a lot of specific visualizations, and they''re immediately useful practices.

3. Taxonomies: Of the most useful business and management blogs I read, some of their most useful posts (I''m thinking of randsinrepose.com, for example) are taxonomies. "The five kinds of meeting attendees." "The four kinds of firefighting." Or whatever. These are helpful to me because by enumerating a problem space as a handful of distinct categories they help me crystallize my own thinking about it. Olivia does this when she enumerates the four kinds of charisma. Look, I think I''m a good manager and leader, an empathetic guy and good at my job, I''m not gonna lie, but I''d never thought about it in this way. This was pretty eye-opening to me. I read this part and thought, oh yeah, I''ve got the "focus" and "kindness" charisma but less of the "authority" and definitely least of all the "visionary" charisma. And that gives me specific things to work on, and a way to understand why I''m better at motivating people in certain circumstances rather than others.

To anyone who wants to be more charismatic: to be more successful at work, more able to positively influence those around them, more able to open up and make real connections with others, and just more able to lead a rich and happy life - and I know how this sounds, I swear I don''t usually gush like this! - this book tells you everything you need to know. Everything! No other book I''ve read does that.

To be clear, that''s like saying Rippetoe''s "Starting Strength" tells you everything you need to know to be a very good, extremely strong weightlifter. You still have to do a ton of really hard work! This book doesn''t make you magically charismatic. But it gives you direct, specific, applied practices that, if you do them, will make you more charismatic and enrich your life. Of all the pop psychology, management, leadership, and professional self-help books I''ve ever read, I cannot say that about a single other one.

I give this book my absolute highest recommendation. It is absolutely superb. I don''t say that lightly.
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Thomas J. Farrell
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Perceptive, Accessible, and Well Written!
Reviewed in the United States on September 5, 2019
Recently I read Bryan Clark’s feature story “What Makes People Charismatic, and How You Can Be, Too” in the New York Times (dated August 15, 2019). His article is based on Olivia Fox Cabane’s 2012 book The Charisma Myth: How Anyone Can Master the Art and Science of Personal... See more
Recently I read Bryan Clark’s feature story “What Makes People Charismatic, and How You Can Be, Too” in the New York Times (dated August 15, 2019). His article is based on Olivia Fox Cabane’s 2012 book The Charisma Myth: How Anyone Can Master the Art and Science of Personal Magnetism (Portfolio/ Penguin). I was impressed with his article, and so I ordered her book. I am impressed with it because it is perceptive, accessible, and well written.

In it, Cabane says, “Until the 1980s, in fact, many highly influential leadership thinkers, such as Peter Drucker, vehemently opposed both the study and teaching of charisma. Drucker frequently pointed out that the most charismatic leaders of the last century were Hitler, Stalin, Mao, and Mussolini” (page 220).

Like Drucker, Cabane in her 2012 book can be described as a leadership thinker. Like Drucker, she is addressing people in business organizations, although she occasionally mentions certain political leaders as exemplifying something she is discussing. Clearly leadership can and does occur in a great variety of contexts, not just in the context of business organizations and in the context of political organizations. This is why I see her book as so valuable.

Cabane says, “presence turns out to be the real core component of charisma, the foundation upon which all else is built” (pages 5-6). In my estimate, what she means by presence is essentially what the American psychotherapist Carl Rogers (1902-1987) means by unconditional positive regard – the attitude he urges psychotherapists to have toward a client in the context of psychotherapy.

The other two dimensions that Cabane sees as basic for charisma are what she refers to as (1) power and (2) warmth (toward us personally, or at least toward our kind, whatever that may be). She says, “‘Fight or flight?’ is the power question. ‘Friend or foe?’ is the warmth question” (page 5).

According to Cabane, leaders project the three crucial aspects of charisma: presence, power, and warmth, consciously or subconsciously (page 6). But she also says that “charisma is the result of specific nonverbal behaviors” (page 4). Consequently, she devotes a great deal of attention to body language and nonverbal communication. For example, she even devotes a chapter to “Charismatic Body Language” (pages 143-164).

Cabane says, “Charisma gets people to like you, trust, and want to be led by you” (page 2). In my estimate, she seems to presuppose that you know something about the people you want to have like you, trust you, and be led by you. But she does not explicitly discuss this presupposition – perhaps because she assumes that it is implied in the context of a given business organization.

Because her book is a self-help book for leaders in business organizations, Cabane devotes a chapter to the technique of visualization: “Creating Charismatic Mental States” (pages 67-97).

Now, Cabane routinely refers to accessing certain dimensions of our psyches and projecting them. However, whenever we project something that we have accessed from our own psyches, we do so in a given context. Then when other people in the given context respond to what we are projecting, they, in turn, are also projecting something from their psyches that matches what we are projecting.

For example, Trump projects whatever Trump projects, and his most ardent supporters match his projections from his psyche with similar projections from their own psyches. In this way, Trump and his most ardent supporters form a kind of mutual admiration society with one another.

Now, the late American Jungian theorist and psychotherapist Robert L. Moore (1942-2016) of the Chicago Theological Seminary worked out what he refers to as four kinds of archetypes of maturity in the human psyche:

(1) the Royal archetypes (King and Queen);
(2) the Warrior archetypes (masculine and feminine);
(3) the Magician archetypes (masculine and feminine);
(4) the Lover archetypes (masculine and feminine).

Each of us comes equipped with these four kinds of archetypes of maturity in our psyches. According to Moore, each gendered archetype of maturity has one optimal form, but two “shadow” forms. Each of the eight optimal forms is pro-social, but each of the sixteen “shadow” forms tends not to be pro-social.

For example, Hitler, Stalin, Mao, and Mussolini did not exemplify pro-social optimal forms of the archetypes of maturity. On the contrary, each of them projected “shadow” forms from his psyche, and their followers who regarded each of them as a charismatic leader also projected “shadow” forms from their own psyches onto each leader.

Now, Cabane describes what she refers to as four styles of charisma (pages 98-114), which are related to the kinds of archetypes of maturity that Moore describes:

(1) authority charisma (involving the Warrior archetypes, masculine and feminine);
(2) focus charisma (involving the Royal archetypes, King and Queen);
(3) visionary charisma (involving the Magician archetypes, masculine and feminine);
(4) kindness charisma (involving the Lover archetypes, masculine and feminine).

Cabane says, “Authority charisma is primarily based on a perception of power: the belief that this person has the power to affect our world. We evaluate someone’s authority charisma through four indicators: body language, appearance, title, and the reaction of others” (page 104).

For Trump’s most ardent supporters, he projects authority charisma, as Cabane operationally defines and explains this charisma style (pages 104-107). In the case of Trump, I suspect that the reaction of others that his most ardent supporters pay attention to includes not only positive reactions of others, but also negative reaction of others – that is, the negative reactions of others that his most ardent supporters tend to dislike.

Cabane says, “Focus charisma is primarily based on a perception of presence” (page 99).

Cabane says, “Visionary charisma makes others feel inspired; it makes us believe” (page 101; her emphasis).

Cabane says, “Kindness charisma is primarily based on warmth” (page 103).

Incidentally, Robert Moore and Douglas Gillette describe the four masculine archetypes of maturity in this 1990 book King, Warrior, Magician, Lover: Rediscovering the Archetypes of the Mature Masculine (HarperSanFrancisco).
6 people found this helpful
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Clover
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The most helpful book you will ever read.
Reviewed in the United States on July 14, 2015
I''m usually too lazy to write these reviews, so the fact that you see one right here, right now, should be proof enough about how much this book has really wowed me. I got this book mainly so I could better improve my interaction with friends, and the tools I found in... See more
I''m usually too lazy to write these reviews, so the fact that you see one right here, right now, should be proof enough about how much this book has really wowed me.
I got this book mainly so I could better improve my interaction with friends, and the tools I found in this book have impacted my life in such a way that I never expected. Now I recommend this book to anyone who struggles with friendship problems, social situations, business situations, or even self-esteem. I have never expected to learn so much from this book and would recommend it to anyone.
146 people found this helpful
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Lisa H
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
will help you connect with others
Reviewed in the United States on December 16, 2018
Luckily, I read this book as part of a study group because it is not something I would have read on my own. However, it has turned out to be one of my favorite books because I feel that I can now connect better with others through conversation. I also appreciate that it has... See more
Luckily, I read this book as part of a study group because it is not something I would have read on my own. However, it has turned out to be one of my favorite books because I feel that I can now connect better with others through conversation. I also appreciate that it has helped me keep my emotions in check and recover quicker from upset. I highly recommend this book if you want to improve your conversation skills and keep your emotions in check.
9 people found this helpful
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Amazon Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Read this book
Reviewed in the United States on June 22, 2015
I chose to read this book for a college self-improvement assignment, and it is the best book I have ever read. I swear it''s as if Cabane has been studying my thoughts and what happens inside my mind for my entire life. This book has literally changed the way that I think,... See more
I chose to read this book for a college self-improvement assignment, and it is the best book I have ever read. I swear it''s as if Cabane has been studying my thoughts and what happens inside my mind for my entire life. This book has literally changed the way that I think, and I have seen improvements in my Charisma after just reading the first chapter. I do not read often (which I am hoping to change), but I find myself trying to read this book every opportunity I can. The author uses simple language to explain her concepts, and she portrays all of her ideas in logical manners. I was surprised to find the science and biology behind Charisma. A must read! I recommend it to all!
30 people found this helpful
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Top reviews from other countries

Chris Bledsoe
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
This won’t make you charismatic; it’ll make the author rich.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 3, 2019
This will not make you charismatic. It is a hodgepodge of unstructured generic advice that includes such profound wisdom as “wear comfortable clothes”. Real charisma is exerted by people with an abundance of energy, humour, conviction and authenticity. It is exerted by...See more
This will not make you charismatic. It is a hodgepodge of unstructured generic advice that includes such profound wisdom as “wear comfortable clothes”. Real charisma is exerted by people with an abundance of energy, humour, conviction and authenticity. It is exerted by people who are present in the here and now with you. This is a collection of cheap gimmicks that are often so banal and fascile that it makes you realise anyone trying to do them will be so utterly non-charismatic as to bore you to tears. Save your money and practise being authentic and present in your next few encounters with people and notice what difference that makes instead.
58 people found this helpful
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Djilly L.Top Contributor: Harry Potter
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Slightly more empowered
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on November 24, 2018
I have a total lack of charisma, my personality is as bland as blank sheet of paper. And I am as unremarkable as a tiny fish in a vast shoal. Yet I’m frequently involved marketing events and have to give presentations to large crowds. So I can only dream of having the...See more
I have a total lack of charisma, my personality is as bland as blank sheet of paper. And I am as unremarkable as a tiny fish in a vast shoal. Yet I’m frequently involved marketing events and have to give presentations to large crowds. So I can only dream of having the charisma of Obama or JFK. At the same time there is little hope for me as I rarely read self-help books mostly because they are generally poorly-written by self-obsessed authors and teach me trivial things that I already know. This book is not so different. Yet it places the myth of charisma in a decent perspective. In the end I should be glad I picked up the book and worked through it. As it is somewhat helpful, it teaches you important elements of charisma and how to be more mindful of that. Now I fill the room a little bit more with my presence. I have gained a slightly more magnetic personality. And feel I’m better able to steer my daily group meetings in my desired direction. Moreover.. my power over the other-sex has dramatically increased! haha.. but from a very low level, as it was non-existent before.
32 people found this helpful
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CZ
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Got to love it! With so many suspect self-help books out ...
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on August 7, 2016
Got to love it! With so many suspect self-help books out there, this one really delivers. Separating charisma into three main aspects: Strength, Power and Presence, the author takes you through each and explains their background and how you can improve in the different...See more
Got to love it! With so many suspect self-help books out there, this one really delivers. Separating charisma into three main aspects: Strength, Power and Presence, the author takes you through each and explains their background and how you can improve in the different areas. A key theme here is that people can change and improve in these respects. You aren''t born charismatic (that''s the myth), rather you can nurture and develop habits which will give you charisma. The recommendations aren''t merely a sticking plaster over the ''real'' (uncharismatic) you; but rather help you peel off negative habits like drifting off when speaking with people, or holding onto resentment; thus exposing the real charismatic You. Famous characters'' charisma is discussed and some have more or less of the three main foundations for charisma, so there is plenty of flexibility to develop what is natural to you. Overall, I can''t recommend this book enough.
17 people found this helpful
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Amazon Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Zero b***s**t - bravo!
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on February 16, 2021
I don''t like books which are full of water and generic words. This one consists of specific advice & technics to follow (realistic ones). Almost zero b***s**t in a book on such topic, just amazing. I am reading it 3rd time now, it''s so rich, that I am picking up new...See more
I don''t like books which are full of water and generic words. This one consists of specific advice & technics to follow (realistic ones). Almost zero b***s**t in a book on such topic, just amazing. I am reading it 3rd time now, it''s so rich, that I am picking up new important things every time. It''s not one of those "you read them in 1 hour trying to get at least 1 useful thought" books. Sincerely recommend.
One person found this helpful
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Bubbles
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Five Stars
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on October 10, 2017
Good read but could do with more specifics
6 people found this helpful
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